The Couple and Family Lab

The couple and family lab is a research unit located in the department of Developmental Psychology at Aarhus University. Research projects within this lab focus on the growth and well-being of couples and families, changes during family transitions, and the reciprocal interactions between psychopathology and family systems. A separate and major focus of our work is to develop and test different kinds of flexible and easy-access couple- or parent-oriented interventions and test their effectiveness.  

Tea Trillingsgaard

Associate Professor Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Tea Trillingsgaard is an associate professor at the Development Psychology Department at Aarhus University and head of the research unit. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2012 from Aarhus University, Denmark. Her program of research seeks to understand how couple and family relationships naturally unfold, as well as how interventions influence this course. Most of her projects focus on adapting and testing integrative behavioral couple- and parent-oriented interventions that can combine to form an effective stepped-care model for real world settings. She trains and supervises couple therapists in conducting IBCT (integrative behavioral couple therapy) and in using the web-based couple therapy program www.OurRelationship.dk

Hanne Nørr Fentz

Psychologist Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Hanne Nørr Fentz received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology in 2014 from Aarhus University, Denmark. She is a researcher with a special interest in the bidirectional influences between couple relationship functioning and individual psychopathology, such as depression. Her research investigates how dyadic processes and gender roles may influence psychological distress and adaption to the parental role. She is also involved in multiple randomized controlled studies on adapting and testing integrative behavioral couple-interventions (OurRelationship, Par-tjek), e.g. in web-based formats, and parent-oriented interventions (the Family Startup program).       

Astrid Bjørn Leth-Nissen

Research Assistant Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Astrid Bjørn Leth-Nissen is a psychologist with a PhD degree in Developmental Psychology. Her main interests lie within in the field of couples’ relationship quality and universal couple-interventions. Her PhD included a validation of a multi-dimensional questionnaire of relationship risk and resources (AIRR) and a randomized controlled trial of a 5-year Marriage Checkup Booster Session.

Anne Klode

PhD Student Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Anne Klode is a psychologist and PhD student with main interests in the field of parenthood research, in particular the role of the parent, parenthood practices, parenting norms and culture, gender roles, fatherhood, motherhood, coparenting, and parent wellbeing. Her PhD focuses on shared parenting and family system effects of early father involvement.

Lea Tangelev Greve

PhD Student Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences

Lea Tangelev Greve is a psychologist and PhD student with main interests in the fields of couple and parenting research. Her PhD focuses on the parent-training program Incredible Years and its short and longer-term effects and moderators in a large Danish community sample.

Frederik Godt Hansen is postdoc at the research unit. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Aarhus University, Denmark in 2021 with a dissertation combining insights from social psychology with public administration literature (the dissertation can be found online here: https://politica.dk/frederik-godt-hansen). His work at the Research Unit for Couple- and Family Research includes the implementation of couple-focused interventions in municipalities, where he is involved in developing research designs and in testing the effectiveness. He is also affiliated with Aarhus University’s research center for inequality, PIREAU, where he for instance conduct register-based investigations of inequality in health and economics related to couple- and family relationships.