Are we able to remember things that never happened?

Researchers from all over the world will be discussing the interrelationship between memory and our perceptions of the future at a conference hosted by Aarhus University from 20–21 June 2013 at Radisson Blu Scandinavia Hotel, Aarhus.

2013.06.12 | Tine Bagger Christiansen

At the conference, leading researchers from around the globe will be combining the many different proposed answers to what and how we remember. Photo: Colourbox.

Autobiographical memory is key to our ability to participate in social contexts and to keep our relations and identity. But which factors influence what and how we remember? At the conference, leading researchers from around the globe will be combining the many different proposed answers.

- How can you be influenced to remember things that never happened? What would this mean in, for example, court cases?

- Why are elderly people removed from their home when research suggests that this impairs their functional capacity and memory?

- How do social factors affect children's memory?

Entitled 'Social Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory - Memory and Imagination', the conference is organised by the Center on Autobiographical Memory Research – CON AMORE – at Aarhus University.

Keynote speakers:

Amanda Barnier, Macquarie University (Australia)
Annette Bohn, Aarhus University (Denmark)
Maryanne Garry, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand)
Gail Goodman, University of California, Davis (United States)
William Hirst, New School for Social Research (United States)
Monisha Pasupathi, University of Utah (United States)
Michael Ross, University of Waterloo (Canada)

For further information

Professor Dorthe Berntsen
Aarhus University, School of Business and Social Sciences
Email: dorthe@psy.au.dk
Tel.: +45 87 16 58 68

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